The SeaQualizer Gives Doomed Fish a Fighting Chance

It's got to be one of the worst ways to go: pulled to the surface against your will, changes in pressure attacking your body, only to be tossed away, no relief in site.

Fish inadvertently caught by sport and commercial fishers are known as “bycatch” and billions of them die every year. The ones affected by shifting pressure experience barotrauma and often due senseless deaths, but a new device wants to give them a fighting chance.

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Beast Friends: Animal Figurines Worth Collecting

To an outside observer, it must have looked strange when I decided to go to wild Namibia in the summer of 2009. I’d spent the previous two years as an unhappy securities lawyer in London, so with the financial recession roiling markets and my firm announcing a coming round of layoffs, I figured it was a good time for a career change. And when I heard about a three-week volunteering program at the Harnas Wildlife Foundation, I knew I had to go.

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Protection Money

In 1872 Ulysses Grant, America's 18th president, proposed Yellowstone, the world's first national park, for "the benefit and enjoyment of the people". A century later, protected areas were arising purely out of environmental concerns. These days, 193 countries together host 209,000 protected areas, spanning 15.4% of the terrestrial realm and 3.4% of the world's oceans. But to set aside an area is not, by itself, to protect it. That requires resources that include funding—and the funding is increasingly coming from unexpected quarters.

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Bracken Cave: Home to the World's Largest Bat Colony

As many as twenty million Mexican free-tailed bats spend their summer months in Bracken Cave, Texas, making it home to the largest congregation of warm-blooded animals in the world. Join me as I capture the unforgettable sight of these bats emerging at dusk to feed and spend time with leading bat expert and photographer, Merlin Tuttle, to discuss the threats facing these often misunderstood mammals.

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Hotel Review: The Marlton in New York City

Brass reading lights flanked a gilded bed frame, whose blue fabric headboard provided a pop of color. Draped across the bed was a faux-fur blanket that I loved for its substantial weight. A black, spidery light fixture dangling from the ceiling added a contemporary twist to the vintage vibe. The cozy room with oak herringbone floors and delicate crown moldings gave me the feeling of being in someone’s brownstone.

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Hotel Review: Topnotch Resort in Stowe

Topnotch is on a five-mile recreation path trailing a winding river — suitable for year-round outings — and close to Smuggler’s Notch State Park. Guests can unwind with a spa treatment or make use of the indoor pool, sauna, steam room and shower, which are comparable to what’s behind closed doors in the spa.

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Zero-Sum Wild Game

"TIGERS and human beings cannot occupy the same space," says Prashanth Kumar Sen, former director of Project Tiger. Human-wildlife conflict arises whenever people and predators share terrain. It is acute in India, where large carnivores like tigers and leopards coexist with dense human populations. Although only 5% of Indian land is classified as protected, India's population of 1.24 billion means that 5m people dwell inside the country’s natural havens. 

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Expanded San Antonio Riverwalk Wows Visitors

The San Antonio River has been at the heart of the Alamo City for centuries — long before Texas gained independence from Mexico or joined the United States — but our relationship with it has always been complex due to flooding caused by the overflow of its banks. City officials have been mitigating this risk since 1724, when a severe flood forced them to move the Alamo.

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Culture, TravelmillieUSA Today
Much Ado About Cornwall

Falmouth sits in the center of the “Cornish Riviera,” England’s charming southwestern coastline, and the port is its lifeblood. For centuries, the world’s third deepest natural harbor ushered in commercial and military vessels, and in the past 70 years it witnessed epic send-offs, including D-Day troops bound for Normandy. 

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Slow Demise

DEMAND for wildlife parts is pushing many species to the brink of extinction. In China, where a rising middle class flaunts wealth by displaying ivory at home, traders call elephant tusks "white gold". But elephants, tigers, rhinos and other "charismatic megafauna" are not the only animals in trouble.

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Powering Down on Costa Rica’s Pacific Coast

In Manuel Antonio, travelers do more than observe nature: they engage it. Along the Pacific coast of Central America, adventure-lovers encounter some of the planet’s most prolific wildlife.

The journey begins outside of San José, where winding roads lead travelers to a bridge above the Tárcoles River. Along its muddied banks are gargantuan crocodiles fattened by daily ranger feedings, seemingly immobilized. After snapping photographs of these behemoth beasts, you’ll continue towards the Pacific Ocean, but little time will pass before wildlife summons you again.

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Musicians as Entrepreneurs

Tethered to electronics, we forget that for centuries individuals were expected to read, write and perform for one another, in the flesh. Music enjoyed a particularly intimate history. Until the 17th century, secular music was played solely within one’s home (hence: “chamber music”).

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Guide to New York's Neighborhoods

Compared to the West Village, a neighborhood with a genuinely residential vibe, Meatpacking remains faithful to its traditional commercial roots despite many dramatic shifts. A century ago, Meatpacking housed some 250 packing plants and slaughterhouses, the gradual departure of which left many large warehouses vacant yet intact. Criminals, scoundrels and party people seized on the abandoned area where they could behave near-anonymously. Business and pleasure were conducted in clubs and darkened alleyways.

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